1. Main
  2. Learn
  3. Politics
  4. Laws, Initiatives

Egypt opposition to appeal vote passing new constitution

Egypt opposition to appeal vote passing new constitution Egypt opposition to appeal vote passing new constitution
Egypt's opposition said on Sunday it will appeal a referendum seen as voting in a new constitution backed by ruling Islamists, and vowed to keep up a struggle that has spawned weeks of protests and instability,
AFP reports. Polling "fraud and violations" skewed the results of the two-stage referendum, the final leg of which was held on Saturday, the National Salvation Front charged. "We are asking the (electoral) commission to investigate the irregularities before announcing official results," a Front member, Amr Hamzawy, told a Cairo news conference. "The referendum is not the end of the road. It is only one battle," said another member, Abdel Ghaffar Shokr, reading from a Front statement. "We will continue the fight for the Egyptian people." Germany immediately backed the call for a transparent investigation into the results. Foreign Minister Guido Westerwelle said: "The new constitution can only meet with acceptance if the process of its adoption is beyond reproach." But Westerwelle said it was "not the power of the street but rather the spirit of compromise and tolerance that should determine the way forward for Egypt." Egyptian state media and President Mohamed Morsi's supporters in the Muslim Brotherhood said the constitution was passed with the support of nearly two-thirds of voters, based on unofficial tallies. A member of the national electoral commission, Mohamed el-Tanobly, told
AFP that "no official date has been fixed" for the publication of the final referendum results. The state news agency MENA had reported they would be released on Monday. Opposition to the charter has fuelled demonstrations for the past month, some of them violent, such as clashes that wounded 62 people in Egypt's second city of Alexandria on Friday, the day before the final round of voting. Late Sunday, unidentified people threw stones at the head of the judges' club, Ahmed Zind, after a meeting in which he denounced an "attack on the judicial process" by "a party that thinks of itself as king of Egypt," a judicial source said. This was seen as a reference to the Brotherhood, from which Morsi hails. The army has deployed troops to reinforce police since December 5 clashes outside the presidential palace in Cairo killed eight people and injured more than 600 others. Morsi and Islamists backing the charter say it is necessary to restore stability after the early 2011 revolution that toppled president Hosni Mubarak. But the opposition sees the new constitution as a wedge to usher in creeping Islamic law through a weakening of human rights, particularly women's rights, and undermine the independence of the judiciary. It accuses Morsi of steamrolling through the referendum without consensus on the charter, and argues that a low voter turnout of around 32 percent undermined the plebiscite's legitimacy. Approval of the constitution would trigger parliamentary elections in two months' time to replace an Islamist-dominated assembly that was dissolved by Egypt's constitutional court before Morsi's election in June. In the meantime, all legislative business is being handled by the senate, also under the sway of Islamists. In a gesture to "national dialogue," Morsi on Saturday appointed 90 additional senators, including eight women and 12 Christians. Washington, which sees Egypt as a pillar of its Middle East policy and provides Cairo with $1.3 billion annually in military aid, has deliberately avoided public comment on the crisis. But the Republican chairwoman of the Foreign Affairs Committee in the US House of Representatives, Ileana Ros-Lehtinen, called the vote "a defeat for the Egyptian people" at the hands of "an Islamic dictatorship." She said: "We must use our aid as leverage to promote democratic reforms, support freedom of religion, and enshrine the protection of minority communities." A foreign ministry spokesman in Iran, whose diplomatic ties with Cairo were cut three decades ago, said the new constitution would advance the goals of all Egyptians.

Nobel prizewinner proposes a new city in KZ
New abnormal snowfalls expected in Kazakhstan
Huge glacier retreat triggered in 1940s
Hyperloop construction begins in Las Vegas
"Moonlight" to top Spirit Awards nominations
Oil prices fall due to investors uncertainty
New dwarf galaxy discovered around Milky Way
Kanat Islam becomes a top ten WBO boxer
World oil prices continue to rise
Kazakhstan expects warming - Kazhydromet
Merkel to seek fourth term as chancellor
Sale of Tintin drawings set to break records
US, EU stocks fall as markets focus on dollar
Pacific leaders urged to defend free trade
EU warns eight nations on budget deficit
Universiade-2017: Athletic Village is ready
Bob Dylan can't make Nobel ceremony
Messi will never leave Barca - club president
Google, Facebook take aim at 'fake' news
Aerosmith announces Europe 'farewell' tour
Putin, Trump to normalise US-Russia ties
At least 10 hurt in southern Turkey blast
6.2 quake hits western Japan
OPEC agrees shock oil output cut
Israeli ex-president and Nobel laureate Peres dies
Germany blocks WhatsApp data transfers to Facebook
32,000 arrested in Turkey coup probe
Youth to the fore as Milan fashion week opens
Xenophobia threatening peace in eastern Germany
Four-in-10 Japanese are virgins: poll
Sweden re-militarises Baltic island of Gotland
China to launch second space laboratory: Xinhua
More than a billion stars mapped in Milky Way: ESA
Boxing: Golovkin eyes Saunders after stopping Brook
Kazakhstan shifts PM to security chief
Oil prices gain despite rising OPEC supply forecast
US to give Philippines military planes
Singapore wages war on Zika-bearing mosquitoes
Italy quake death toll nears 250
Viral photos add fuel to French burkini debate
18 dead as Italy struck by powerful quake
Japan's first lady visits Pearl Harbor
Pokemon's a no-go on Bangkok's roads
July was Earth's hottest month in modern times
Pakistan rock climbers scale new heights