Tengrinews TV Радио Tengri FM Радио Жұлдыз FM Laws of Kazakhstan
KZ RU EN
Write us +7 (727) 388 8020 +7 (717) 254 2710
искать через Tengrinews.kz
искать через Google
искать через Yandex
USD / KZT - 335.71
EUR / KZT - 357.36
CNY / KZT - 48.76
RUB / KZT - 5.23

Clinton warns of more N.Korea 'provocations'

11 april 2012, 15:48
0
US Secretary of State Hillary Clinton (R) shakes hands with Japanese Foreign Minister Koichiro Gemba during a press conference at the State Department in Washington, DC. ©AFP
US Secretary of State Hillary Clinton (R) shakes hands with Japanese Foreign Minister Koichiro Gemba during a press conference at the State Department in Washington, DC. ©AFP
US Secretary of State Hillary Clinton on Tuesday warned North Korea not to go ahead with a rocket launch as she voiced concern that the communist state may also plan more "provocations", AFP reports.

With North Korea apparently ready to launch a long-range rocket within days, Clinton said that the United States was "working around the clock" with allies South Korea and Japan to "sharpen our deterrent."

Clinton said that North Korea's launch plans -- just weeks after the regime signed a deal with Washington to freeze its nuclear and missile programs -- "raises questions about Pyongyang's seriousness in saying that it desires to improve relations with us and its neighbors."

"This launch will give credence to the view that North Korean leaders see improved relations with the outside world as a threat to the existence of their system," Clinton said in a speech to the US Naval Academy.

"And recent history strongly suggests that additional provocations may follow," she said.

Clinton did not elaborate, but a South Korean official earlier said that North Korea appears to be preparing for a third nuclear test after the planned long-range rocket launch.

Meeting earlier in Washington with Japanese Foreign Minister Koichiro Gemba, Clinton said that the United States was consulting with other nations and "we will be pursuing appropriate action."

"If North Korea wants a peaceful, better future for their people, it should not conduct another launch that would be a direct threat to regional security," she told a joint news conference.

Gemba spoke of US-Japanese cooperation if North Korea goes ahead with the launch of a rocket it says will put a satellite into orbit -- an event that most of the rest of the world sees as a disguised missile test.

"The United States and Japan would cooperate with each other and the international community, including the Security Council, would take an appropriate measure," Gemba said.

Neither Clinton nor Gemba explained what they meant by "appropriate" action.

Both top diplomats reiterated that the launch would violate UN Security Council resolutions 1718 and 1874, which ban ballistic missile activity.

US State Department spokeswoman Victoria Nuland voiced concern that the international news media might be "playing" into North Korean propaganda by covering the rocket launch.

"Our concern obviously would be that the North Koreans would use this for propaganda purposes and that... news organizations that cover it extensively might be playing into that," Nuland said.

"But it's obviously your call how to cover this thing," she told reporters during the daily news briefing.

The usually secretive North organized an unprecedented visit for foreign reporters to Tongchang-ri space center in an effort to show its Unha-3 rocket is not a disguised ballistic missile, as claimed by the US and its allies.

The launch is scheduled between April 12 and 16 to mark the 100th anniversary of the birth of North Korea's founding leader Kim Il-Sung, a significant date as Kim's youthful grandson Kim Jong-Un cements his own power.

Нравится
Add comment
Most Read
Most Discussed