Tengrinews TV Радио Tengri FM Радио Жұлдыз FM Laws of Kazakhstan
KZ RU EN
Write us +7 (727) 388 8020 +7 (717) 254 2710
искать через Tengrinews.kz
искать через Google
искать через Yandex
USD / KZT - 335.33
EUR / KZT - 395.49
CNY / KZT - 50.75
RUB / KZT - 5.70

Stories of war heroes

15 may 2013, 12:31
0

Six veterans of the Great Patriotic War shared their life stories with Tengrinews: different stories, different lives and one Victory.

Gabbas Zhumatov had only one day left before his discharge from the army. “A few more hours and I will go back home,” he though in 1941, when the period of his wireman’s service in the artillery troops in Brest was over. But his wishes never came true. “In the beginning we thought that it was raining with thunders. Then we realized that we were being bombarded and everyone took alarm. Honestly, we were waiting for the war but just didn’t know when it would start. It was already in the air,” Gabbas Zhumatov said.

When defending Brest, the soldiers and Gabbas Zhumatov repelled an attack of around 16 tanks but then started to drop back and joined a new artillery regiment. Dropping back and repelling attacks Gabbas Zhumatov reached Moscow with the regiment. He was wounded in the shoulder.

Photo by Vladimir Prokopenko©

Photo by Vladimir Prokopenko©

May 9 brochure devoted to Brest defenders. Photo by Vladimir Prokopenko©

May 9 brochure devoted to Brest defenders. Photo by Vladimir Prokopenko©

Back than sergeants were sent for trainings to become officers, as there were not enough officers. Gabbas Zhumatov was sent to Tomsk Academy. “Who could think that they would send us for training when we almost reached Moscow. I was transferred to the zone of interior. I was naive. I thought that the war would be over by the time I got back.” But the hopes did not come true and in five months the war was still on and Gabbas Zhumatov was sent to the Fifth Don Cossack Cavalry where he saw the ending of the war.

The veteran in the Cossack uniform. Photo by Vladimir Prokopenko©

The veteran in the Cossack uniform. Photo by Vladimir Prokopenko©

After the war Gabbas Zhumatov decided to continue his studies and entered Kazakhstan State University (now Al-Farabi Kazakh National University). He graduated from the university and stayed there to teach history of the socialist party and became a professor.

May 9 postcard signed by former mayor of Moscow Yuriy Luzhkov. Photo by Vladimir Prokopenko©

May 9 postcard signed by former mayor of Moscow Yuriy Luzhkov. Photo by Vladimir Prokopenko©

Now Gabbas Zhumatov lives with his daughter and granddaughter. The veteran enjoys attending May 9 celebrations and is happy to tells his stories to journalists.

Photo by Vladimir Prokopenko©

Photo by Vladimir Prokopenko©

Vladimir Bereznitskiy was not even 18 when he was recruited into the army in May 1944. He was a paratrooper and made one training and two combat drops. He was wounded in the leg and in the stomach. Another bullet perforated his scull injuring his jaw and right eye. The doctors could not save his leg.

Photo by Vladimir Prokopenko©

Photo by Vladimir Prokopenko©

Old heavy wounds remind of themselves. Vladimir Bereznitskiy had many expensive surgeries. Two years ago he went blind and only after this year’s surgery he was able to see again. “My husband’s parents died in the war. I am from am orphanage. But we have survived for all these years,” his wife Nina Bereznitskaya said.

Photo by Vladimir Prokopenko©

Photo by Vladimir Prokopenko©

After a series of hospitals in several countries Vladimir Bereznitskiy found himself in Almaty. He met his wife at Medeo skating rink in 1949. “My friend introduced us. I was with the rink back then working in a coat check -- looking after people's things while they were skating. I felt for her the moment I saw her. We have been together for 64 years since then.”

Photo by Vladimir Prokopenko©

Photo by Vladimir Prokopenko©

The veteran does not complain about his life or his small pension. He only misses the attention that is normally shown only on May 9. “There is no attention. Even a small one, I am not asking for much. It was not my desire to go fight the war at the age of 18, I was protecting the Motherland. I would like to get more attention.”

Vladimir Bereznitskiy with his father. Photo by Vladimir Prokopenko©

Vladimir Bereznitskiy with his father. Photo by Vladimir Prokopenko©

Oryngali Yessengaziyev always dreamed of becoming a military pilot. He grew up in an orphanage in Karatyube village in West-Kazakhstan oblast. Playing with paper planes, he imagined himself flying non-stop over North America together with famous test pilot Valeriy Chkalov.

Photo by Vladimir Dmitriyev©

Photo by Vladimir Dmitriyev©

After graduation from Seleschinsk aviation technical school in Petropavlovsk at the age of 19 he was sent to Novosibirsk where he was appointed troop commander of an artillery battalion on the 9th guards division. “I grew up in an orphanage. Many children wanted to become pilots back then. Not many of them managed to.”

Photo by Vladimir Dmitriyev©

Photo by Vladimir Dmitriyev©

Later Oryngali Yessengaziyev became artillery battery commander of the 19th tank division that took part in many battles of the war. “I was wounded in 1944. One fragment is still under my bladebone opposite to my heart. It has been there for 69 years already,” the veteran said.

Photo by Vladimir Dmitriyev©

Photo by Vladimir Dmitriyev©

Oryngali Yessengaziyev was transferred to Almaty as Agricultural Ministry worker after demobilization. Later he was transferred to the Ministry of State Security and worked to counter banditism. “I like military life the most. I am now involved in public activities but this is not the same. Although, I wish that there are no wars anymore. I wish that the sky remains clear and the life is happy.”

Photo by Vladimir Dmitriyev©

Photo by Vladimir Dmitriyev©

Oryngali Yessengaziyev was awarded with Zhukov decoration, Great Victory medal and has the Saint George’s Cross, Nazarbayyev decoration and other awards: the total of over 40 medals.

Photo by Vladimir Dmitriyev©

Photo by Vladimir Dmitriyev©

Shooting down a whole German aircraft in one shot! 17-y.o. Zinaida Yefanov have never thought she would. But she badly wanted to go to the front line. Everyone went to the front line back then. A schoolgirl from Voronezh who had come there with her parents from Kostanay several years ago even forged her documents to get to the war. She made herself a year older by stating the age of her brother. She never thought she would be wounded and get the blast injury. All she wanted was to shoot. Like in the shooting range where she went every weekend during peaceful years.

Photo by Vladimir Prokopenko©

Photo by Vladimir Prokopenko©

“Right from the Kazan train station in Moscow we were sent to Bologoye, where we were assigned with transfers. Some were sent to do medicine, some to do communications. I wanted to go to the machine gun battalion only. I was very active at school. I trained a lot in the shooting range. That is why I did not want to go anywhere else.” Zinaida Yefanova was sent to the 150th part of the separate 19th rifle division near Moscow. That is where she was first wounded in the hand.

Photo by Vladimir Prokopenko©

Photo by Vladimir Prokopenko©

In 1943 the machine gunner got out of the hospital and went back to the front line. “I was the section chief. We received an order to stay awake and not leave the tank-cuts. I heard a plane flying. I could distinguish if it was our or German plane by its sound. I climbed out of the pit. I pointed a gun at the plane and shot straight at the gasoline tank,” the veteran said. Zinaida received the 3rd grade Order of Glory for shooting down the plane but was demoted to junior sergeant for climbing out of the pit.

Photo by Vladimir Prokopenko©

Photo by Vladimir Prokopenko©

Later Zinaida was wounded once again in her leg. The wound was serious: her knee was crushed to pulp and doctors were going to cut the leg off. But a wounded soldier died in the hospital and doctors decided to transplant the knee-cap from the soldier to Zinaida and managed to save her leg.

A small souvenir and a charm of Zinaida Yefanova. Photo by Vladimir Prokopenko©

A small souvenir and a charm of Zinaida Yefanova. Photo by Vladimir Prokopenko©

Zinaida Yefanova who is now 90 years old lives alone with her dog Garry in Almaty. “Now, when I am old I have started to revive my memories. Everything comes back to me and I cannot go to sleep without thinking about the war,” the old lady with many decorations and medals said.

Photo by Vladimir Prokopenko©

Photo by Vladimir Prokopenko©

Boris Lobov got to the front line in 1941 at the age of 16. He was sent to an area near Moscow where he was first an air mechanic and then became a pilot of Po-2 aircraft. “We were trained to be mechanics and whoever had better health was sent to a pilot school in north Kazakhstan. After that I got to that place near Moscow.” He was later wounded. “Po-2 had quite weak armor. We were bombarded by Germans one night and they burnt 2-3 of our aircrafts. That is how I was injured,” the veteran said. He was serving in Ukraine when the war finished.

Photo by Vladimir Prokopenko©

Photo by Vladimir Prokopenko©

He was not let home right after the war. Air mechanics were trained for two more years to work with jets. These were the first jets in the USSR. That was where Boris met his future wife who wanted to become a pilot. The young people got married but in a few years his wife died in an accident.

Photo by Vladimir Prokopenko©

Photo by Vladimir Prokopenko©

Boris Lobov went back to his parents in Almaty. His parents died pretty soon and he was left alone. He had to work as a mechanic wherever he could get a job. Right now, at the age of 90, Boris Lobov lives in a small room in the Veterans House. He does not complain, he says he feels the same as he felt ten years ago. “I am healthy. It is just boring here. I have lived here for 12 years. It is all the same for many years. But everything is going well in general,” the veteran said.

Photo by Vladimir Prokopenko©

Photo by Vladimir Prokopenko©

Valentina Koscheyeva received graduated from the ninth grade at school in Stalingrad in 1942. “I was 17 when the first heavy bombing started on August 23. Of course, war is war. It was so scary in Stalingrad,” she said. Her parents volunteered to the front line and Valentina got enrolled as well. She was later wounded and received the blast injury.

Photo by Vladimir Prokopenko©

Photo by Vladimir Prokopenko©

In the beginning the young woman worked as a clerk, then she became a courier. Later Valentina Koscheyeva was transferred to a medical unit. “The battle for the city lasted for 200 days and nights non-stop and finished on February 3, 1946. There were only ruins left from my house. My parents stayed at the front line and I went to Ukraine with the medical unit. After that I have also been to Romania and Hungary,” she said. The war was over when she was a private first class of the second headquarters of the Ukrainian front line in Czechoslovakia.

Photo by Vladimir Prokopenko©

Photo by Vladimir Prokopenko©

However, the war was not over for Valentina. After 1945 their division was relocated to the Eastern front line to the war with Japan. “I had no housing, no education. Nothing. So I went. When we got there, my commander told me: That’s it, Valya, you are alive and healthy, so go get yourself an education,” she said.

Photo by Vladimir Prokopenko©

Daughter and granddaughter of Valentina Koscheyeva. Photo by Vladimir Prokopenko©

Valentina Koscheyeva came to Almaty in 1949 to live with her mother and stepfather. She graduated from high school and university and then worked in KazSelEnergoProject institute for over 20 years. She met her husband at work. Because of her injury Valentina Koscheyeva could not have children of her own and they decided to adopt a girl. After her husband died Valentina Koscheyeva moved to the Veteran House. She talks about the war with tears in her eyes but tells about her life with a smile on her face.

Photo by Vladimir Prokopenko©

Photo by Vladimir Prokopenko©

Since childhood Maria Tseluyeva dreamed of becoming a pilot. While studying in college, she got to the Tushinsk airfield where her uncle worked and made her first flight. She was 18 when she persuaded the pilots to give her the wheel and flew over Moscow herself. “My uncle was mad at me. He said: You will kill yourself and the plane! And the pilots will go to jail for letting you fly! But since then they all called The Test Pilot,” Maria Tsaluyeva said.

Photo by Vladimir Prokopenko©

Photo by Vladimir Prokopenko©

Maria Tsaluyeva served in an intelligence department of the Interior Troops of the People’s Commissariat for Internal Affairs (NKVD). Her dream came true and she became a pilot. She took part in battles mainly in Ukraine. “I was a pilot in the beginning and then started to teach paratroopers. I made over 100 dives myself,” Tseluyeva said.

Photo by Vladimir Prokopenko©

Photo by Vladimir Prokopenko©

The war finished when she was in Western Ukraine. In 1948 she was transferred to Almaty where she worked in the security team of Dinmukhamed Kunayev. Maria Tseluyeva currently lives in the Veterans House.

Photo by Vladimir Prokopenko©

Photo by Vladimir Prokopenko©


Нравится
Поделиться
Add comment
Most Read
Most Discussed
Today
Week
Month